Interview: Rebecca Bowyer

Rebecca Bowyer is a Melbourne copywriter, content writer, blogger, book & theatre reviewer and historian. She’s currently working on her first novel, set in a future when children are parented by professional Maters and Paters. This interview is part of our series investigating where creative people draw their inspiration from.   TRM: What were your favourite texts growing up?  RB: I’ve always loved Isobelle Carmody’s Obernewtyn chronicles and read everything by John Marsden that I could get my hands on, especially Tomorrow, When The War Began. Their characters felt real – I could easily imagine myself into the story –…

Four Great Things to Read

Here is a small collection of links which explore similar themes to that reminds me. “The Importance of Reading While Pregnant” focuses on experiencing the uncertainty of pregnancy with a backdrop of advice books and manuals. The parenting books… actually have the invaluable ability to bring together both parts of my being: the familiar one—me the person, and this new one, still being explored—me the mother; my mind as a reader, and my body as an incubator.   “My Life in Dogs Ears” tells the story of a life mediated by literature.   “The Public Voice of Women” discusses the way…

We are stardust before we are divided

  Stefan Klein, the acclaimed writer behind The Science of Happiness and The Secret Pulse of Time, is on a mission to connect laypeople with the diverse and often misunderstood realm of science. With his latest book, We Are All Stardust, Klein sits down with some of the world’s most prominent scientists and poses the questions that us laypeople feel too intimidated to ask. The result is a collection of casual conversations with people who, at first, seem so extraordinary that we will never understand them. Yet, Klein brings them back to Earth, and we learn that they are just…

True Despair, True Connections

Worthless is the real-life story of young author Robyn Hennesy’s struggle with sexual abuse, eating disorders, bullying, depression, self-harm, criminal activity, and drug addiction. Told in a raw and practically unedited form (it feels like we are sometimes reading the quickly scribbled diary entry of a teenager) we are brought face-to-face with all the terrible and heart-wrenching moments of Robyn’s, and her twin sister Ashleigh’s, life growing up in Surrey, England. They are average young girls, who have ordinary aspirations and dreams. This is all disrupted when, at age nine, the twins begin to starve themselves and worry about their…

Embracing the Strange

I think I am a strange person. There’s no one thing or anecdote to point to that definitely confirms it. Perhaps talking on national television about my commitment to take pictures of myself frowning in front of world monuments adds to the overall collage of oddity. The time I snuck into a bar underage in order to enter their Simpsons trivia contest (all the while praying that I wouldn’t win the grand prize of a jug of beer) also does a lot to summarise the way my mind works. So does my penchant for naming inanimate objects. I don’t really…

Recognising and Recovering from Disappearance

Recognition Fiona Wright has offered a collection of reflective essays, Small Acts of Disappearance, on what it is to have anorexia, what it means and what it does. I’ve spent a lot of time in my life reading about a range of mental illnesses, including anorexia but I learned a lot from Wright’s work. Actually, I was surprised by how relevant it was to me. A returning theme for Wright is her initial understanding of her failing health and diminishing diet as being wholly separate from ‘those people’. ‘Those people’ with real eating disorders, she thinks, want to lose weight…

Waking Up to Horrible Freedom

Freedom feels scary, feels too big and every time I think about what I might do I stop being able to think about anything. In existentialist philosophy, freedom might be the very point of our humanity, but also the exact thing that makes it hard to be human. In Marlee Jane Ward’s debut novella, Welcome to Orphancorp, Mirii is on the verge of freedom. She has spent most of her life in an industrial orphanage. She has had to work to the bone for privileges like schooling and fruit. She has been denied adult love and guidance, as well as…